Contact

Book Applause

Murray, Utah, USA Click on “Contact” above, to send an email to Jonathan Whitcomb

About Jonathan Whitcomb

I don’t know why you’d want to contact me, but I’ll tell you a little about myself. I became fascinated by the game of chess when I was in the seventh grade at John Marshal Junior High School in Pasadena, California. By the end of eight grade, I was the best chess player among the 2,000 or so students there, at least as well as anyone could tell. Most students were more into school studies, strange to tell. It may have been in 1964 when I first tutored an adult chess player: My Aunt Eleanor wanted to learn how to beat my Uncle Paul. For the next ten years, those who learned chess from me were mostly opponents whom I had defeated in tournament competition and in the casual games in chess clubs and among friends. To be open, I learned a lot myself, losing as much as 15% of the casual games and much more than that in the tournaments. But loses can help us improve. In 2015, I started writing my first book on chess: Beat That Kid in Chess. I put much into that book, for I had learned much, over the previous half century, about what early beginners need the most, in improving their ability to play chess.
© 2015  Jonathan David Whitcomb
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Jonathan Whitcomb and his wife, Gladys
Contact

Contact

Book Applause

Murray, Utah, USA Click on “Contact” above, to send an email to Jonathan Whitcomb

About Jonathan Whitcomb

I don’t know why you’d want to contact me, but I’ll tell you a little about myself. I became fascinated by the game of chess when I was in the seventh grade at John Marshal Junior High School in Pasadena, California. By the end of eight grade, I was the best chess player among the 2,000 or so students there, at least as well as anyone could tell. Most students were more into school studies, strange to tell. It may have been in 1964 when I first tutored an adult chess player: My Aunt Eleanor wanted to learn how to beat my Uncle Paul. For the next ten years, those who learned chess from me were mostly opponents whom I had defeated in tournament competition and in the casual games in chess clubs and among friends. To be open, I learned a lot myself, losing as much as 15% of the casual games and much more than that in the tournaments. But loses can help us improve. In 2015, I started writing my first book on chess: Beat That Kid in Chess. I put much into that book, for I had learned much, over the previous half century, about what early beginners need the most, in improving their ability to play chess.
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© Jonathan David Whitcomb 2015